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Friday, August 26, 2016

A Longevity Insurance Benefit for Social Security: An Innovation from the Past

John Turner, Pension Policy Center

In the United States, poverty rates for seniors increase at older ages.  The rates are higher for persons age 75 and older than for persons age 65 to 74.   Poverty rates increase at older ages because relatively more people fall into poverty as they age than exit poverty due to death. Persons who live longer may fall into poverty because of various life events -- their spouse dies, they have higher medical or long-term care expenses than expected, or their investment returns are worse than projected. As Americans live longer, they face an increased risk of outliving their savings.

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Posted on August 26, 2016  |  Write the first comment
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Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The Role of Paid Family Leave in Reducing Workforce Disparities

Alexandra Bradley, Health Policy Analyst

In recent decades, women have entered the work force in droves, making substantial contributions to families’ financial stability. As a result, however, the once common figure of a stay-at-home caregiver is rapidly diminishing, and families are left to fill in the gaps. Despite increasing responsibilities outside the home, women still also shoulder the primary responsibility of both caregiving for children and for ill or aging adult family members. Increasing pressure to make ends meet with less time and stagnant wages is taking both a financial and emotional toll on working families.

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Posted on August 16, 2016  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, August 11, 2016

Social Security at 81: A Wise Program Fit for New Challenges

Elliot Schreur, National Academy of Social Insurance


Sunday, August 14 is the 81st anniversary of our Social Security system.  While few of us were alive to celebrate the system’s first anniversary in 1936, even fewer have living memories of the social problems that gave rise to it. At the time, half of all seniors were living in poverty, individual retirement savings plans like 401(k)s were 40 years away, and depression-era workers were having a hard enough time providing for themselves and their children, let alone supporting their parents and grandparents. What are we to make today of a program that was created in an almost unrecognizable industrial economy?

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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Who Knew? Social Security in Presidential Nomination Remarks

Rebecca Armendariz, 2016 National Academy of Social Insurance Intern, University of Maryland

                  

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Posted on August 4, 2016  |  Write the first comment
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Friday, July 29, 2016

Why Does the United States Lack a Comprehensive Social Insurance System?

William J. Arnone, National Academy of Social Insurance

Thoughtful commentary on how we got from there to here

In a recent issue of the Boston Review, Elizabeth Anderson, Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, wrote a provocative analysis ("Common Property: How Social Insurance Became Confused with Socialism", 7-25-16) of the origins and evolution of social insurance worldwide and in the United States. Her article includes key points that are critical to an understanding of the positioning of social insurance in our economic and political system, and in our culture. She poses a fundamental question: Why does the U.S. lack a comprehensive, universal social insurance system?

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