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Friday, February 5, 2016

Income, Health, and Wealth Inequality Emerge as Strategic Focus of Academy Following January Policy Research Conference

Kristen Arnold, National Academy of Social Insurance

A blizzard dropping nearly 28 inches of snow did not stop hundreds of social insurance experts from participating in the Academy’s 28th annual policy research conference last week, Disparate Income, Wealth, and Opportunity: Implications for Social Insurance. Co-chaired by Kilolo Kijakazi of the Urban Institute, Maya MacGuineas of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, and David Colby, the two-day conference – built upon two Fall convenings on the same topic – ushered in the Academy’s new strategic focus on income and wealth inequality. Participants, including new and veteran Academy members, came together to share views from both sides of the aisle on income, wealth, gender, and racial/ethnic disparities and how social insurance and other public policies can play a role in mitigating them in fiscally sustainable ways.

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Thursday, April 29, 2010

Calling All Champions of Social Security

Harry C. Ballantyne
Cheif Actuary, Retired, Social Security Administration

In going to the Baltimore Museum of Art recently, I saw a painting that had, as an artist's name "Circle of Rembrandt." When I asked one of the docents at the museum what that meant, I found that originally, it was thought to be a painting by Rembrandt, but found later not to be. The painting turned out to be by one of Rembrandt's students, so they decided to credit the artwork to the name "Circle of Rembrandt."

Consequently, in honor of Bob Ball and his legacy, I think it would be fitting that future good (and, they would have to be good) ideas for improvements in the financing and adequacy of Social Security benefits may merit the name "Circle of Bob Ball."

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Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Recent Changes in Dutch Health Insurance

Kieke Okma
Adjunct Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management, New York University

In 2006 the Netherlands implemented a new health insurance system that requires all citizens to buy health insurance from a regulated insurance company of their choice; insurers must accept all applicants; the government subsidizes children and low-income families. Recent Changes in Dutch Health Insurance analyzes the new Dutch system and considers whether it might serve as a model for the U.S. The working paper emphasizes some of the major differences between the Netherlands and the U.S., including the extensive role of the Dutch government in regulating the health sector and the egalitarian tradition in Dutch social policies.

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Posted on September 22, 2009  |  Write the first comment
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Friday, September 18, 2009

Re-Figuring Federalism: Nation and State in Health Reform's Next Round

Lawrence D. Brown
Professor of Public Health, Columbia University

Health reform must recognize the extensive role of states in U.S. health policy and reconcile national consistency with sub-national diversity. Re-Figuring Federalism: Nation and State in Health Reform's Next Round draws lessons both from federal-state relations in Medicaid and from the experiences of three other federal countries—Canada, Germany and Switzerland. It concludes that universal health coverage is compatible with a federal system, but that the federal government needs to establish central rules of the game.

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Posted on September 18, 2009  |  Write the first comment
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Tuesday, January 11, 2005

The Chilean prescription will worsen US social security ills

Carmelo Mesa-Lago, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Pittsburgh

Jośe Piñera, former minister of labor under Pinochet and the “father” of pension privatization in Chile, as well as a promoter of that approach throughout the world, has recently discussed his conversations with and encouragement to President Bush to apply the Chilean prescription to cure U.S. social security ills (New York Times, December 1, 2004, A81).

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