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Long-Term Care

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Where Does the Commission on Long-Term Care Leave Us?

G. Lawrence Atkins, Federal Commission on Long Term Care and National Academy of Social Insurance

Organizing the delivery and financing of long-term services and supports (LTSS) for people with significant cognitive and physical functional limitations has been a challenge in the U.S. for decades.  Most of the LTSS is provided by family caregivers, but when people need paid services and supports for an extended period they encounter an array of services and providers that can be confusing, frustrating and expensive.  Although the cost of an extended period of LTSS is an insurable risk, this country does not have a well-structured financing approach that protects people or enables people to adequately protect themselves against this risk.  Families and individuals can exhaust their resources paying for LTSS and then have to turn to Medicaid for help.  Medicaid, which today finances two-thirds of paid LTSS, is a major expenditure for federal and state governments that is projected to intensify as LTSS needs double with the aging of the baby boom.

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Posted on October 10, 2013  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, October 10, 2013

Long-Term Services and Supports: The Path Forward

Judy Feder, Urban Institute and Georgetown Public Policy Institute

Laphonza Butler, SEIU-United Long Term Care Workers

Henry Claypool, American Association for People with Disabilities

Judith Stein, Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc.

Lynnae Ruttledge, National Council on Disability

All eyes are on the Affordable Care Act’s launch, extending health insurance to tens of millions of people without it. Despite the continued political battle, even the ACA’s critics seem to get that insurance is essential to assure access to care and protection against financial catastrophe.

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Thursday, September 5, 2013

Open Letter to the Long Term Care Commission

John Cutler
Senior Policy Analyst, US Office of Personnel Management, The views expressed are my own and not in any official capacity

Bruce Chernof, Chair
Mark Warshawsky Co-Chair

September 2013

Dear Bruce and Mark and Members of the Commission:

Congratulations on an outstanding job in a short amount of time.  I’m one of those people who think it will work out well in the end since I’m not sure more time would allow you to solve the political difficulties of getting to consensus in the current environment.  Only when Congress views it as necessary to “own” this issue will there be substantial movement even though many things can be done by the Administration on its own if shown the way.

Having said that, there are many ideas you can throw out to them to hopefully get some small efforts moving forward.

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Posted on September 5, 2013  |  Write the first comment
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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Experts Present Options for Redesigning and Financing America’s Long-Term Care System

by National Academy of Social Insurance

Social Insurance is a Critical Base for Achieving Universality and Efficiency

Hundreds of long-term care (LTC) experts gathered in Washington, D.C. today at The SCAN Foundation briefing to discuss private and public options for delivering and financing long-term care to the 12 million Americans who currently need it and the 27 million people expected to need it by 2050.

The discussion comes at a critical time. Congress recently approved the formation of a bipartisan commission on long-term care, tasked with making recommendations on meeting the nation’s needs for affordable long-term care services and support. Direct spending in the United States for long-term care services was $211 billion in 2011, with Medicaid picking up more than 62 percent of the tab. 

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Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Time to Help States Make Lemonade on Issue of Long-Term Care?

The nation has no viable strategy to help people finance their long-term care

Lee Goldberg, National Academy of Social Insurance

A version of this article originally appeared in Roll Call on February 4, 2013.

The enactment of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 averted the so-called fiscal cliff, but it also repealed the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act that was intended to create a public mechanism to help people pay for long-term services and supports if they become disabled.

The repeal was not a surprise. More than a year ago the administration abandoned plans to implement CLASS after it became clear that premiums for the program as designed — with participation to be voluntary rather than mandatory — would be too high to attract more than a tiny percentage of the population.

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Posted on February 6, 2013  |  2 comments  |  Add your comment
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