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Long-Term Care

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Time to Help States Make Lemonade on Issue of Long-Term Care?

The nation has no viable strategy to help people finance their long-term care

Lee Goldberg, National Academy of Social Insurance

A version of this article originally appeared in Roll Call on February 4, 2013.

The enactment of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 averted the so-called fiscal cliff, but it also repealed the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports Act that was intended to create a public mechanism to help people pay for long-term services and supports if they become disabled.

The repeal was not a surprise. More than a year ago the administration abandoned plans to implement CLASS after it became clear that premiums for the program as designed — with participation to be voluntary rather than mandatory — would be too high to attract more than a tiny percentage of the population.

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Posted on February 6, 2013  |  2 comments  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, October 27, 2011

Lessons from the Likely Demise of CLASS

Lee Goldberg, National Academy of Social Insurance

Lee GoldbergOn October 14, the Obama administration halted implementation of the new federal long-term care insurance program – the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) initiative, which had been tucked into health care reform legislation. It is disappointing, but not surprising that the administration was unable to design a financially self-sustaining, voluntary long-term care insurance program. The unusual legislative journey of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which had no House-Senate conference to clean up the bill, left CLASS with statutory limits that proved unworkable. Without mandatory participation or some other way of achieving near universal participation, the program did not stand a chance.

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Posted on October 27, 2011  |  3 comments  |  Add your comment
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Tuesday, October 11, 2011

A Midsummer Policy Sonnet

Erik Shive, Former Intern, National Academy of Social Insurance

The piece was written in August 2011 

Now is the summer of our blasted dissent,
With our eyes cast upward at the debt ceiling,
And no one seems even remotely content.
Will this fallout leave us fiscally reeling?

Into this bloodless, ever-present, hot fray,
Come bright-eyed, eager interns ready to learn.
They are told for social insurance to pray,
For nothing it will give and take all we earn.

Unemployment is in federal error,
The Class Act has been passed but still needs a fix,
Medicare is causing the old to terror,
Social Security’s done by ‘thirty-six.

But UI’s computers will be updated,
A tweak here, one there, and the Class Act will roll,
By healthcare reform, Medicare is sated,
Though Social Security still has a toll.

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Posted on October 11, 2011  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, December 9, 2010

How Do We Provide Affordable Care For Millions Of People, Preserving Their Independence, Without Breaking Their Pocketbooks Or Bankrupting The Taxpayers?

Bob Rosenblatt
Senior Fellow, National Academy of Social Insurance

Each summer, NASI’s Somers Aging and Long-Term Care Research Internship program selects 5-7 graduate students to spend 12 weeks receiving high-quality training in policy research skills on challenging issues facing the diverse aging population of the United States.

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Posted on December 9, 2010  |  9 comments  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, December 2, 2010

What does the Report of the Fiscal Commission Co-Chairs Mean for Health Policy?

Lee Goldberg
Director of Health Policy, National Academy of Social Insurance

The Co-chairs of the President’s Commission presented a number of policy proposals aimed primarily at reducing the growth spending on Medicare and Medicaid. Given the size of the two programs, some of these changes may impact health care spending patterns in the private economy, but many will simply shift costs to other payers. Few, if any, proposals would address the underlying growing demand for services triggered by an aging population and a long term care system that relies on private savings.

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Posted on December 2, 2010  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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