Share/Bookmark Syndicate content

Workforce Issues & Employee Benefits

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

A Social Policy Call to Arms at NASI's Conference

Andrea Louise Campbell, 2014 Conference Co-Chair, MIT

As a co-chair of this year’s Academy policy research conference, I was gratified by the excellent turnout, the fascinating presentations, and the thoughtful discussions. I was most inspired, however, by three speakers, who, through their very different personal styles, issued a social- policy call to arms.

Read More…
Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Quick Facts from Newest Census Poverty Data

Jasmine V. Tucker, National Academy of Social Insurance

Today marks the release of new data from the Census Bureau on Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011. Some key points from the report are:

Read More…
Monday, August 20, 2012

Retrenchment of Privately Managed Individual Accounts in Central Europe

Elaine Fultz, Former director of the International Labor Organization office for Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia

The partial privatization of Central European pension systems is now a well-known phenomenon.  Beginning in the late 1990s, with support from the World Bank, many Central European governments scaled down their public, pay-as-you-go pensions and established mandatory, privately managed individual investment accounts.  Hungary and Poland led this process, launching new second tier accounts in 1998 and 1999, respectively.  They were soon followed by Latvia (2001), Bulgaria, Croatia and Estonia (2002), Lithuania (2004), Slovakia (2005), the Republic of Macedonia (2006), and Romania (2008). Since capitalized accounts require three to four decades to accumulate sufficient funds to pay full benefits, this major pension restructuring is still at an early stage.

Read More…
Friday, July 6, 2012

Three Years of Sluggish Recovery Means UI Benefits are Still Critical for Millions of Unemployed Workers

Jasmine V. Tucker, National Academy of Social Insurance

Three years into a very modest recovery, unemployed workers continue to experience hardship and are facing cuts to emergency unemployment insurance benefits.

June 2009 marked both the official end of the Great Recession and the beginning of the current recovery, which has been plagued by high unemployment rates, historic long-term unemployment, and sluggish job growth. The national unemployment rate in June 2012 was 8.2%, 3.2 percentage points higher than at the start of the recession in December 2007, and the employment situation in most states is still bleak. If we consider a broader unemployment measure that includes workers who have given up searching for work and those who are underemployed (employed but not working as many hours as they would like), the unemployment rate is much higher -- 14.6%.

Read More…
Friday, February 3, 2012

Employers in Many States Face Tax Hike To Help Repay Federal UI Loans

Jasmine Tucker, National Academy of Social Insurance

Employers in 28 states owing $38.2 billion to the federal government for unemployment insurance benefits incurred an increase in their Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) tax this week.  Revenues from the tax increase will go directly toward repaying the balance of the loans.  A total of 35 states opted to borrow federal dollars because their unemployment insurance trust fund reserves were insufficient to weather the recent economic downturn.  The deep and prolonged Great Recession, current sluggish recovery, and continued high rate of long-term unemployment have further reduced revenues and increased outgoing unemployment insurance payments.

Read More…