Workforce Issues and Employee Benefits

Home/Discussions Post/Workforce Issues and Employee Benefits

Executive Summary: Workers’ Compensation: Benefits, Costs, and Coverage (2018 Data)

Workers’ compensation insures millions of workers and their families against the risks associated with lost wages and medical costs in the event of injury on the job, workrelated illness and, in extreme cases, the death of a worker. It is the only social insurance system run almost entirely by states, with no federal guidelines. Despite being a core component of the U.S. social insurance ecosystem, workers’ compensation often receives less attention than other SI programs, like Social Security and Medicare, in part because it has no federal aspect.

November 2nd, 2020|

REPORT: Workers’ Compensation Benefits, Costs, and Coverage – 2018 Data

The 23rd annual report produced by the Academy on Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs, and Coverage (2018 Data) provides the only comprehensive data on workers' compensation benefits, coverage, and employer costs for the nation, the states, the District of Columbia, and federal programs. Drawing on a unique combination of data from state workers’ compensation agencies, A.M. Best, and the National Council on Compensation Insurance, the report is guided by a Study Panel of experts with diverse research, policy, and practice experience.

October 28th, 2020|

Social Security Finances: Findings of the 2020 Trustees Report

Each year, the Report of the Social Security Trustees updates projections about the future finances of Social Security’s two trust funds, the Old-Age and Survivors (OASI) Trust Fund and the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund. The 2020 Social Security Trustees Report projects that revenues will be sufficient to pay all scheduled benefits until 2035 and three-quarters of scheduled benefits thereafter. The DI Trust Fund is now projected to cover scheduled benefits until 2065 (compared with 2052 in last year’s Trustees Report), and the OASI Trust Fund until 2034 (the same projection as last year’s report). On a combined OASDI basis, Social Security is fully funded until 2035 but faces a projected shortfall thereafter if Congress does not act before then.

May 1st, 2020|

Executive Summary: Workers’ Compensation: Benefits, Costs, and Coverage (2017 Data)

Workers’ compensation insures millions of workers and their families against the risks associated with lost wages and medical costs in the event of injury on the job, work-related illness and, in extreme cases, the death of a worker. It is the only social insurance (SI) system run almost entirely by states, with no federal guidelines.

Despite being a core component of the U.S. social insurance system, workers’ compensation often receives less attention than other SI programs, like Social Security and Medicare, in part because it has no federal aspect. To fill part of this gap, the National Academy of Social Insurance produces an annual report on state and federal workers’ compensation program benefits, costs, and coverage. This latest report provides new data for 2017, with comparison data for the five-year period from 2013 to 2017.

October 30th, 2019|

REPORT: Workers’ Compensation Benefits, Costs, and Coverage – 2017 Data

The 22nd report in the series, Workers' Compensation: Benefits, Costs, and Coverage (2017 Data) provides the only comprehensive data on workers' compensation benefits, coverage, and employer costs for the nation, the states, the District of Columbia, and federal programs. 

Download the report

Download the Executive Summary

Read the national press release

Read state-specific findings:

October 29th, 2019|

Social Security Finances: Findings of the 2019 Trustees Report

Each year, the Report of the Social Security Trustees updates projections about the future finances of Social Security’s two trust funds, the Old-Age and Survivors (OASI) Trust Fund and the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund. The 2019 Social Security Trustees Report projects that revenues will be sufficient to pay all scheduled benefits until 2035 and roughly three quarters of scheduled benefits thereafter.

April 29th, 2019|

PRESS RELEASE: New Study: Workers’ Compensation Benefits and Costs Continue to Decline as a Share of Payroll

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Workers’ compensation benefits as a share of payroll declined in 2016, continuing a five-year trend, while employer costs as a share of payroll fell for the third straight year, according to a new report from the National Academy of Social Insurance (the Academy). Despite the downward trends at the national level, the experiences of individual states varied dramatically.     

October 10th, 2018|

PRESS RELEASE: In Tennessee, Workers’ Compensation Benefits as a Share of Covered Payroll Decline Sharply

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Tennessee experienced a sharp decline in workers’ compensation benefits as a share of covered payroll in 2016, according to a new report from the National Academy of Social Insurance (the Academy). Workers’ compensation costs to Tennessee employers also declined as a share of payroll, but at a slower rate.

Workers’ compensation benefits paid to injured workers and their health care providers in Tennessee fell from $0.53 per $100 of covered payroll in 2015 to $0.48 per $100 of payroll in 2016, a 9.4 percent decrease compared to an average decrease of 3.6 percent nationally.

October 10th, 2018|

PRESS RELEASE: In Oklahoma, Steep Declines in Workers’ Compensation Benefits and Costs Continue

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oklahoma experienced some of the largest annual percentage declines in workers’ compensation benefits and costs as a share of payroll across the country in 2016, according to a new report from the National Academy of Social Insurance (the Academy). The drop continues downward trends in workers’ compensation benefits and costs as a share of payroll in Oklahoma that are far outpacing the rest of the nation.  

In 2016, Oklahoma’s workers’ compensation costs to employers declined by 13.7 percent to $1.45 per $100 of covered payroll – the third largest decline in the country – while costs in the rest of the country decreased by an average of 2.3 percent to reach $1.26 (Figure 1).

October 10th, 2018|
Go to Top