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Thursday, September 6, 2018

Just the Facts?

William Arnone, CEO, National Academy of Social Insurance

According to a recent report from the Pew Research Center, nearly eight-in-ten Americans say that, when it comes to important issues facing the country, most Republican and Democratic voters not only disagree over plans and policies, but also cannot agree on basic facts.

Only 18% of Republicans and 23% of Democrats surveyed said that voters of the two parties can agree on basic facts, even if they disagree over policies and plans. Among the differences in respondents of the Pew survey, their ages were most telling. Younger Americans were less likely than older Americans to say that the two parties cannot agree on basic facts.

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Posted on September 6, 2018  |  Write the first comment
Friday, August 10, 2018

Future Leaders Discuss Solutions to the Social Security Financing Gap

Bethany Cole, 2018 Rashi Fein Intern in Health Policy and Griffin Murphy, 2018 Merton C. Bernstein Intern on Social Insurance

 

On Wednesday, August 1, dozens of summer interns and young professionals gathered at the 2018 Summer Social Security Academy in Washington, DC to engage in thoughtful discussion about the features and future of Social Security. Guided by actuaries from the Social Security Administration (SSA), participants explored policy options to address the adequacy of benefits and achieve long-term financial balance. For attendees, it was a brief glimpse into the frequent discussions that take place on Capitol Hill and in policy circles around the country.

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Posted on August 10, 2018  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, June 28, 2018

Redesigning employee benefits

Nortin M Hadler
Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Microbiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The American “healthcare system” has evolved piecemeal over the course of the last century. With Theodore Roosevelt’s defeat in the presidential election of 1912, the United States diverted from the European dialectic. America disavowed nearly all social legislation that addressed challenges to health, work capacity, and longevity. Only the Prussian notion of Workmen’s Compensation Insurance made landfall and was rapidly embroiled in debates relating to Constitutionality. The solution was that each state was to develop a scheme that required employers to provide medical care and income substitution for a worker who suffered an injury that arose out of and during employment.

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Posted on June 28, 2018  |  Write the first comment
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Thursday, May 24, 2018

Autopsy of a Retirement Plan

James W. Russell
Adjunct Professor of Political Science, Portland State University

https://www.aaup.org/article/autopsy-retirement-plan?link_id=11&can_id=bdbc0d306f89414980d15a11b54b4554&source=email-cultivating-our-classrooms-2&email_referrer=email_357191&email_subject=cultivating-our-classrooms#.WweH-NQvzIV

In "Autopsy of a Retirement Plan," AAUP Academe (May-June 2018), social policy analyst James W. Russell demonstrates why his defined contribution retirement plan despite having high rates of contributions and investment earnings still failed to produce adequate retirement income.

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Posted on May 24, 2018  |  Write the first comment
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