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Monday, October 15, 2018

Personal post-retirement risk and the future of Social Security

The following are comments by Anna Rappaport from the Academy’s forum on the Future of Social Security, held on September 5, 2018, in Chicago, Illinois. Anna served as a discussant for a presentation by Henry Aaron on his proposed set of reforms to assure the long-term financial balance of Social Security.

I agree with Henry Aaron about the changes in the environment that lead to an increase in personal risk over time. And the level of personal post-retirement risk is increasing.

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Posted on October 15, 2018  |  2 comments  |  Add your comment
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Monday, October 15, 2018

Uninsured and underinsured risks in this millennium

William Arnone, CEO, National Academy of Social Insurance

As the Academy gears up for our 31st annual policy conference, Regenerating Social Insurance for Millennials and the Millennium, I am thinking back to what we have learned from our last few conferences.

Our 2016 conference premiered the Academy’s focus on inequality. Keynote speaker Marc Pearson, Deputy Director of Employment, Labor and Social Affairs at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), reminded us that:

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Friday, September 14, 2018

Bringing social insurance topics to your classroom with resources from the Academy

Renée M. Landers

Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School, and Board Vice Chair and Distinguished Visiting Fellow, National Academy of Social Insurance

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Just the Facts?

William Arnone, CEO, National Academy of Social Insurance

According to a recent report from the Pew Research Center, nearly eight-in-ten Americans say that, when it comes to important issues facing the country, most Republican and Democratic voters not only disagree over plans and policies, but also cannot agree on basic facts.

Only 18% of Republicans and 23% of Democrats surveyed said that voters of the two parties can agree on basic facts, even if they disagree over policies and plans. Among the differences in respondents of the Pew survey, their ages were most telling. Younger Americans were less likely than older Americans to say that the two parties cannot agree on basic facts.

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Posted on September 6, 2018  |  Write the first comment