Caregiving

Future of Social Security, Medicare, and more will be shaped by lessons from COVID-19 Crisis

In a new compendium, The Future of Social Insurance: Insights From the Pandemic, fourteen top experts on Social Security, Medicare, the economy, labor and workforce issues, retirement, aging, disability and long-term care, describe what we have learned from the pandemic so far. Each reflects on how social insurance programs have come to the aid of millions of Americans during today’s extraordinary economic and health catastrophes, and how policymakers might further strengthen the programs for future crises.

October 22nd, 2020|

Caregiving needs across the country, Biden’s $775 billion proposal, and a social insurance approach

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted both severe inadequacy and major inequalities in our country's caregiving infrastructure. Prior to the pandemic, needs for child care, as well as long-term services and supports (LTSS) for older adults and adults living with disabilities, were already growing.

For many families, care demands may become unmanageable, or manageable only at significant cost to family members’ health, well-being, income, and careers. This is especially true for women — especially women of color — who face stark disadvantages in terms of financial security and labor force attachment when meaningful access to affordable early child care and education (ECCE), and to paid family and medical leave (PFML), are lacking.

July 24th, 2020|

Nonpartisan Expert Panel Examines Policy Options to Better Support Families and Caregivers

In a new report developed by a Study Panel of the nonpartisan National Academy of Social Insurance, panelists provide state policymakers with a broad range of policy options to better support families in meeting evolving care needs over the lifespan.

The report, Designing Universal Family Care, was developed over a year of deliberations by a Study Panel of 29 experts in care policy from a variety of perspectives. The Panel, convened by the Academy beginning in November 2017, included public health and health policy experts, health researchers, actuaries, and economists. Academy members Marc Cohen, Co-Director of the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass Boston, and Heidi Hartmann, President and CEO of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, served as the Panel Co-Chairs.

June 24th, 2019|

Designing Universal Family Care: State-Based Social Insurance Programs for Early Child Care and Education, Paid Family and Medical Leave, and Long-Term Services and Supports

This report explores strategies that states could pursue to better support families in meeting evolving care needs over the lifespan. The first three chapters of the report explore the challenges families face in the realms of early child care and education (ECCE), paid family and medical leave (PFML), and long-term services and supports (LTSS). For each care domain, the panel identifies policy options along with the tradeoffs associated with specific policy choices; this is done within the context of assuring universal access, affordability, and financial stability through well-defined financing mechanisms. The concluding chapter explores how an integrated approach to care policy might be designed—one offering families a single point of access to ECCE, PFML, and LTSS benefits—under an umbrella program called Universal Family Care.

June 21st, 2019|

PRESS RELEASE: National Academy of Social Insurance Launches Study of State-Based Social Insurance Programs for Paid Leave, Affordable Child Care, and Long-Term Services and Supports

Washington, DC – The National Academy of Social Insurance announced a new project today, “Designing State-Based Social Insurance Programs for Paid Leave, Affordable Child Care, and Long-Term Services and Supports.” As part of the project, the Academy is forming a study panel to shed light on the design challenges states face in developing programs to meet these needs.

November 17th, 2017|
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