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Medicare and Health Policy

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

The Benefit that Robert Ball Wouldn’t Administer

Lisbeth B. Schorr, Center for the Study of Social Policy

It was early 1965 when I sat in on a meeting that was one of a series deliberating the final touches of the legislation that would soon be enacted as Medicare. Those gathered that day were the Undersecretary of HEW, Wilbur Cohen, the Commissioner of Social Security, Robert Ball, a representative of the White House whose name I can no longer remember, and the director of social security for the AFL-CIO, Nelson Cruikshank.

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Thursday, March 28, 2013

Affordable Health Care Made Today For Tomorrow: Integrated Primary Care

Geoffrey M. Orokos

Like anyone who owns a computer, tablet or smart phone, I am frequently reminded during the budget and sequester discussions that the muscle driving our social insurance programs – our nation’s economic prosperity – is fatigued. With our budget deficit forecasted in 2013 at $845 billion, total debt more than $16.1 trillion, poverty at 15.1 percent and total health care spending near 18 percent GDP – many agree that cause for concern is warranted.

As a mental health case coordinator living and working in New York State’s poorest city-per-capita – I find these talks and statistics particularly unnerving – as one in three Americans receiving Medicare today receive treatment for a cognitive or mental impairment. On my own caseload, more than half of my clients are Medicare recipients.

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Posted on March 28, 2013  |  14 comments  |  Add your comment
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Thursday, May 24, 2012

Medicare and Medicaid Reforms That Can Help Curb Costs

Adam Jutha

Increased use of comparative effectiveness research in funding decisions for Medicare and Medicaid programs will ensure technologic advancements demonstrate cost containment strategies and improved quality of health care services when new medical innovation is proposed for use in the United States’ health care system, thereby reducing overall health care expenditures.

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Monday, March 19, 2012

The Affordable Care Act Turns Two

Lee Goldberg, National Academy of Social Insurance

Sabiha Zainulbhai, National Academy of Social Insurance

March 23rd, 2012 will mark the second anniversary of the signing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). This legislation represents one of the largest and most comprehensive reforms to the American health care system since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The ACA seeks to extend coverage to roughly 50 million uninsured Americans, slowing down the growth in the cost of health care, and improving the quality of care health care by changing the delivery system.

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Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Social Insurance Programs and the President’s Budget

Virginia Reno, National Academy of Social Insurance

Lee Goldberg, National Academy of Social Insurance

Tom Bethell, Visiting Scholar, National Academy of Social Insurance

President Obama’s February 14th budget proposal for fiscal year 2012 would freeze or reduce funding for many federal programs as part of a strategy to begin reducing the federal deficit. The nation’s major social insurance programs – Social Security and Medicare – appear to have been exempt from such changes, at least for the moment.

The release of the President’s budget proposal is, of course, only the beginning of what will be a difficult and unpredictable negotiating process with a divided and contentious Congress. In the course of negotiations the pledges made this week by the President could be markedly altered, with potentially long-term consequences for the people who rely on these social insurance programs.

Social Security
Under the heading “Secure Social Security,” the President’s budget message states:

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Posted on February 16, 2011  |  1 comment  |  Add your comment
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