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Workers’ Compensation

Workers’ compensation is a no-fault insurance program which provides employees who become injured or ill at the workplace coverage of medical costs and partial wage replacement. It consists of a unique program in each state and a series of programs for federal employees.

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Benefits, Costs, and Coverage – 2018 Data

The 23rd annual report provides the only comprehensive data on workers’ compensation benefits, coverage, and employer costs for the nation, the states, the District of Columbia, and federal programs over a five-year study period of 2014 – 2018.
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Benefits, Costs, and Coverage
Workers’ Compensation & COVID-19
Latest on Workers’ Compensation
Disparities Across States

Benefits, Costs, and Coverage

November, 2020
The 23rd annual report produced by the Academy on Workers’ Compensation: Benefits, Costs, and Coverage (2018 Data) provides the only comprehensive data on workers’ compensation benefits, coverage, and employer costs for the nation, the states, the District of Columbia, and federal programs.
November, 2020
Workers’ compensation insures millions of workers and their families against the risks associated with lost wages and medical costs in the event of injury on the job, workrelated illness and, in extreme cases, the death of a worker.
More on Workers’ Compensation

Workers’ Compensation & COVID-19

May, 2020
The U.S. workers’ compensation system in its current form is complex, opaque and fragmented. Unlike other social insurance programs, it is wholly administered at the state level, and there is neither federal oversight nor any federal mandate that sets out minimum standards.
June, 2020
The online discussion was anchored by several brief presentations on each area, with a Q&A moderated by Bill Arnone, Chief Executive Officer. Participants contributed questions throughout the webinar.
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Latest on Workers’ Compensation

September 11, 2020
Workers’ compensation experts have expressed concern in recent years about the impact of decades of state cost-cutting measures and resulting uneven and increasingly inadequate benefits for injured workers.[1] Indeed, a ProPublica investigation reveals the steep decline in compensation for disabling injuries, including cutting off benefits long before many workers have recovered and refusing coverage for necessary aspects of care:
More on Workers’ Compensation

Disparities Across States

May, 2020
The U.S. workers’ compensation system in its current form is complex, opaque and fragmented. Unlike other social insurance programs, it is wholly administered at the state level, and there is neither federal oversight nor any federal mandate that sets out minimum standards.
November 2020
States’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic with respect to workers’ compensation policy will likely prove an important factor in providing critical support to workers while protecting employers from liability.
October, 2019
Over the past ten years, Ohio has experienced a larger decrease in Workers’ Compensation benefits per $100 of payroll than all but one other state.
October, 2019
In 2003, Florida passed sweeping changes to workers’ compensation laws. These changes led to both reductions in employee benefits and improved conditions for insurance carriers, trends that largely continue through 2013-2017, the period studied for this year’s report on Workers’ Compensation Benefits, Costs, and Coverage.
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