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Advancing Equity and Inclusion through Social Insurance

Advancing Equity and Inclusion through Social Insurance

 Registration is closed for this event
June 21, 2016, 1:00 pm 5:00 pm
Location
National Press Club
529 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
United States
Contact Elliot Schreur
Panel 1: Insuring Innovation: Entrepreneurs and Social Insurance in an Aging and Diverse Society

Entrepreneurship is a key driver of economic growth, but entrepreneurs face many risks, including loss of economic security. A supportive social-insurance infrastructure can make it easier for risk-takers to realize their entrepreneurial potential. Programs such as Social Security, the ACA, unemployment insurance, and Medicare are integral parts of this infrastructure, particularly with respect to the entrepreneurial potential of older adults and racial minorities. This panel discussion will bring experts on entrepreneurship among seniors and people of color together with experts on social insurance to explore how social insurance supports entrepreneurship, and what more could be done. This panel is funded by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Panelists:

  ​Yasuyuki Motoyama
   Director of Research and Policy
   Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

 

Walter Frick (moderator)
Associate Editor
Harvard Business Review

 

   Gareth Olds
   Assistant Professor of Business Administration
   Harvard Business School

 

 ​Jean C. Setzfand
 Senior Vice President, Programs
 AARP

 

​  Justin G. Tanner
  Associate Director, Office of Legislative, Education & Intergovernmental Affairs,
  Minority Business Development Agency,
  U.S. Department of Commerce

 

Panel 2: Unequal Access to Paid Family Leave: A Key Source of Disparities in the Workforce

The lack of paid family leave coverage for working Americans reinforces existing disparities among workers by gender, race and ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, socio-economic status, and part- versus full-time status. While the Family and Medical Leave Act has been a critical support for those who are eligible, data have shown that those who can afford to take unpaid leave are much more likely to be white, highly educated, and higher socioeconomic status employees. This is problematic for a society in which income inequality across demographic groups is already widespread. An expert panel will explore how the lack of a universal paid leave policy is disparately affecting long-term success for workers, and what can be learned from existing state and international paid leave programs.

Panelists: 

Heather Boushey
Executive Director and Chief Economist
Washington Center for Equitable Growth

 

Sarah Jane Glynn (moderator)
Director, Women’s Economic Policy
Center for American Progress

 

 Aparna Mathur
 Resident Scholar, Economic Policy
 American Enterprise Institute (AEI)

 

 Christopher Ruhm
 Professor of Public Policy and Economics,
 Frank Batten School of Leadership  and Public Policy,
 University of Virginia

 

Panel 3: What is Social Security’s Role in Reducing the Racial Wealth Gap?

Much of the discussion on the racial wealth gap has focused on the importance of helping families of color gain greater access to the means to build wealth through traditional assets like housing, retirement funds, and personal savings. These are undeniably important components in achieving greater equality in wealth. Yet could an additional policy lever to help communities of color build wealth be Social Security? Ensuring the stability of Social Security’s finances and pursuing discrete policy changes to the program could help to increase the asset holdings of black and Latino families and have a significant impact on the racial wealth gap. This panel discussion will discuss the racial wealth gap and explore the implications of changes to Social Security on the racial wealth gap.

Panelists:

   Maya Rockeymoore
   President/CEO
   Center for/Global Policy Solutions

 

    Jeff Cruz (moderator)
    Senior Analyst for Social Security and Income Security
    Senate Budget Committee

 

  Benjamin Veghte
  Vice President for Policy
  National Academy of Social Insurance

 

   Kilolo Kijakazi
   Institute Fellow
   The Urban Institute

 

The event precedes the 2016 Robert M. Ball Award, honoring William Spriggs.